“There is nothing so hypnotic as the truth.”

“A good building is the greatest of poems.”

“Every great architect is—necessarily—a great poet.”

“Beauty in all forms is inspirational.”

Keiran Murphy

Keiran Murphy has been the principal historic researcher at Taliesin, the home of Frank Lloyd Wright located outside of Spring Green, WI. Murphy has been involved in the research, preservation and interpretation of the five-building complex on the Taliesin Estate, co-author (with architectural historian Anne Biebel) of a published article on a find at Wright’s Hillside structure, as well as the Hillside Comprehensive Chronology.

She served as co-curator of “Taliesin: the Work of a Lifetime” in 2011, has given a number of PowerPoint presentations on the history of Wright, his home, his family, and his Taliesin Fellowship community, narrated a 3-D Virtual tour of Taliesin, and has consulted on several books about Wright and Taliesin. Murphy received her MA in Art History from the University of Wisconsin and her BFA from Emerson College, in Boston, MA.

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THE LATEST FROM ‘MS. KEIRAN’.

Black and white photograph of dormitory room at Taliesin

Oh my Frank – I was wrong!

A bed in a room at Taliesin. I’ll explain why it’s here in the post below. About what? About a photograph. But, while I’ve been wrong sometimes about things with Taliesin, I haven’t usually communicated those things to other people. In this case, I was wrong about a photograph I put in a post of […]

 

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Winter photograph looking at the Hex Room and spire at the Frank Lloyd Wright Visitor Center.

How I became the historian for Taliesin

Looking west at the Hex Room in the Frank Lloyd Wright Visitor Center. I took this photo in February of 2005. You can see through the Hex Room, which is the room with the red roof and spire straight ahead of you. The clear view through the room is two vertical rectangles. If I had […]

 

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Looking northwest at Frank Lloyd Wright's Hillside building during April 26, 1952 fire

1952 fire at Hillside

Looking northeast at the southern facade of the Hillside building while the smoke still looms in its April 26, 1952 fire. I don’t know who took this photograph. It came from a newspaper article that was given to the Preservation office probably in the 1990s. As someone who worked at Taliesin, you got used to […]

 

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