“There is nothing so hypnotic as the truth.”

“A good building is the greatest of poems.”

“Every great architect is—necessarily—a great poet.”

“Beauty in all forms is inspirational.”

Keiran Murphy

Keiran Murphy has been the principal historic researcher at Taliesin, the home of Frank Lloyd Wright located outside of Spring Green, WI. Murphy has been involved in the research, preservation and interpretation of the five-building complex on the Taliesin Estate, co-author (with architectural historian Anne Biebel) of a published article on a find at Wright’s Hillside structure, as well as the Hillside Comprehensive Chronology.

She served as co-curator of “Taliesin: the Work of a Lifetime” in 2011, has given a number of PowerPoint presentations on the history of Wright, his home, his family, and his Taliesin Fellowship community, narrated a 3-D Virtual tour of Taliesin, and has consulted on several books about Wright and Taliesin. Murphy received her MA in Art History from the University of Wisconsin and her BFA from Emerson College, in Boston, MA.

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THE LATEST FROM ‘MS. KEIRAN’.

Postcard of crowd at Taliesin. Caption on card: "WEST WING. WRIGHT'S BUNGALOW". Property: Patrick Mahoney

What is the oldest part of Taliesin? Part II

A postcard looking (plan) northeast at the western façade of Taliesin’s hayloft, summer (the hayloft is under the roof). Because the collection of people are unexpected at a farmhouse, Randolph C. Henning (who collected this postcard), thinks this was taken the day after Taliesin’s 1914 fire and murders. I wrote The Oldest Thing at Taliesin […]

 

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Thanksgiving at Taliesin

My next post, Oldest Part of Taliesin, II , is on the way (part I is here). First though, I’m going to add a portion of an “At Taliesin” article posted in 1936 that was about Thanksgiving. In 1936, the Taliesin Fellowship, with the Wrights, celebrated Thanksgiving in Wisconsin. Here’s writer, Marya Lilien, on the […]

 

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Photograph taken at Taliesin in late summer. The structure has been built, although not all of the windows are in. One man is bending working on teh ground.

What is the oldest part of Taliesin? Part I

Looking (plan) east at Taliesin from the balcony of its hayloft, fall 1911. Taken by Taylor Woolley, who worked as a draftsman for Wright at Taliesin. I showed this image in the post, “This will be a nice addition“. While people don’t ask that question at other Frank Lloyd Wright buildings, it’s part and parcel […]

 

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